September 1, 2017 Catherine Mendoza 24Comments

You might be curious about how the Elephant Jungle Sanctuary looks like and what’s happening inside. Here’s one quick description: it’s a paradise for one of the most enormous and most powerful animals on the planet.

Well, finally, after a not so long discussion with my boyfriend, we set the date to visit it. Yay! I couldn’t wait for that day to arrive! It’s on my bucket list!

When I posted a picture, some of my friends and my sister asked me how to get there. Even before they asked me about it, I already knew that I wanted to write about the fantastic experience, because I wanted to share the happiness visiting the Elephant Jungle gave me.

 

How to book and how to get there 

 

Chris booked online. You can do it, too! Usually, it is better to book online or find a trusted agency. I suggest to book it online, as it is less hassle. In Chiang Mai, however, you’ll find travel agencies on every corner and there are many pamphlets available for every tour you desire.

Below is the real photo of our transaction.

The Real experience inside the Elephant Jungle Sanctuary Camp 8

We paid 3,400 Baht for two which includes pick up from our hotel, lunch, souvenir bag, and other activities with the elephants. It’s a half-day tour.

 

You can go to Elephant Jungle Sanctuary website or you can also check their Facebook page for more information.

 

 

Yay! We just got off ! We’re ready soon!

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Real Experience inside the Elephant Jungle Sanctuary Camp 8.35
On the way! Can’t wait!

 

Introduction 

 

Welcome to the Elephant Jungle Sanctuary Camp 8

The Real Experience inside the Elephant Jungle Sanctuary Camp 8.36

 

The Real Experience inside the Elephant Jungle Sanctuary Camp 8.41

It was a fun start. We were asked to introduce ourselves to one another just to get along well since we were in the same group. I think I was the only Asian. Other travelers would always mistake me for a Thai if I didn’t speak English.

The staff conducted a briefing and explained to us what we could do during our interaction with the elephants. They also shared a short history and a background on the owner.

One thing that you must know, elephant riding is prohibited.

Important reminder: Please do not support elephant riding in Thailand, as they’re being beaten before getting acquainted with tourists.

 

The Real Experience inside the Elephant Jungle Sanctuary Camp 8.7

 

 

 

A little information about the Elephants in the Elephant Jungle Sanctuary Camp 8

There are two types of elephants at the sanctuary: African and Asian. African elephants are bigger in than Asian elephants. Even their tusks and ears are bigger. There are 6 elephants at camp 8. The youngest is 6 years old and it’s surprisingly enormous.

Tuma is a female elephant which is 10 months pregnant. Elephants carry their offspring in their womb for 22 months. They have a life span of 75 years and they can only have 5-6 babies in their lifetime.

 

Elephant Jungle Sanctuary
This is Tuma, she’s 10 months pregnant. I was trying to listen to her baby in her tummy!

Aside from that, the female elephants are friendlier than the male. According to the caretakers, some male elephants can have mood swings as humans do, or should I say, most women. (Haha!) They can also be more aggressive! So watch out, or you might be kicked out!

The Real Experience inside the Elephant Jungle Sanctuary Camp 8

 

The Real Experience inside the Elephant Jungle Sanctuary Camp 8.39

 

The Real Experience inside the Elephant Jungle Sanctuary Camp 8.5

Yep! You may touch, cuddle with, embrace (if you can), and take a selfie with them! Elephants seem to be friendly, although you’d be a little bit jumpy. They don’t eat human beings, don’t worry.

 

And if you’re wondering how their hair or skin feels like, it’s so sharp like a needle and the skin feels dry! That’s why they always need a mud bath to soften their skin!

The Real Experience inside the Elephant Jungle Sanctuary Camp 8.5

 

 

Activities 

The first activity that we were advised to do was elephant feeding. Elephants eat bananas, sugar cane, sugar cane leaves and grass. Did you know that these enormous animals can eat 150-200 kg of food and drink 100-150 liters of water per day? Their poop takes about an hour! 

 

Feeding Time! Foods

The Elephant Jungle Sanctuary

Give one piece of banana at a time, then hide the rest behind your back. Otherwise, they might finish the whole bunch.

The Real Experience inside the Elephant Jungle Sanctuary Camp 8.36

The Real Experience inside the Elephant Jungle Sanctuary Camp 8.5

The Real Experience inside the Elephant Jungle Sanctuary Camp 8.5
Ahh, so lovely! But its hair is so sharp!

 

The Real Experience inside the Elephant Jungle Sanctuary Camp 8.5

The Real Experience inside the Elephant Jungle Sanctuary Camp 8.5

 

As a regular routine, after getting stuffed by delicious foods, it’s time for their mud and bath! Can you guess where they bathe? 

 

Mud BathTime! 

 

 

The Real Experience inside the Elephant Jungle Sanctuary Camp 8.20

 

The Real Experience inside the Elephant Jungle Sanctuary Camp 8.14

 

The Real Experience inside the Elephant Jungle Sanctuary Camp 8.7

The Real Experience inside the Elephant Jungle Sanctuary Camp 8.36

 

Finally, Bathtime Baby! 

We together with the elephants were headed to the river for rinsing off and bathing. Yay, we badly needed this, didn’t we? Haha! Just be careful, though, because it’s a bit slippery down the river and the water current is too strong. But no worries, the guides are very attentive. They won’t let you out of their sight.

 

The Real Experience inside the Elephant Jungle Sanctuary Camp 8.7
Follow me! Are you ready?

The Real Experience inside the Elephant Jungle Sanctuary Camp 8.7

The Real Experience inside the Elephant Jungle Sanctuary Camp 8.37

The Real Experience inside the Elephant Jungle Sanctuary Camp 8.7

 

We devoured into the foods that the organizers prepared and cooked for us, chicken, vegetables, rice, and pineapple. Beer is also available for 50baht per can. It was also a moment to chat and get to know more of the other travelers that joined the tour.

 

Overall

Just an observation: The caretakers sometimes pinch the elephant’s ear. I don’t know exactly why, but I believe they do it just to bridle the abrupt and sudden actions of the lovely animals. I never asked, but I wished I did just to clarify my thoughts.

 

Anyhow, no words can describe how much we indulged in spending precious moments with the elephants even just for half a day. For me, it’s a priceless experience. And if I will be given another chance, I’ll be more than willing to come back and babysit them! I would also probably go to see the elephant center next time.

The Real Experience inside the Elephant Jungle Sanctuary Camp 8.30

The Real Experience inside the Elephant Jungle Sanctuary Camp 8.33

I strongly suggest you go and see them with your own eyes. Indeed, photos are too inviting, but seeing them in person is much more rewarding. 

Have you been here? How was your experience? Did you enjoy it! Let me know in the comments below! 

 

                                  Thanks for reading! ♡

 

 

  • One of my uncles rode an elephant in his marriage. And it was our responsibility feed that beast while it was chained outside our house. In India, one of our gods has the head of an elephant. Good to know from your post that Thailand is not just about sex tourism ))0

  • I am used to African elephants so the ones in Thailand seem small to me .:-) . Bath time with the elephants looks like such fun. It is good to know that they are properly taken care of.

  • Wow that is a great experience! Taking a mud bath with the elephants must be so exciting! Thanks for the tips like tourists should not ride an elephant because they are beaten to do so. I think if travelers are aware of these small tips, a lot of environmental damage can be avoided! All in all, a really entertaining post!

  • What a wonderful experience this looks to have been! It must have been so good to interact with elephants this way although you might have been a bit nervous at first. It’s great that this attraction is one where the animals are not treated badly and they seem to have a good life.

  • I just got a little jealous reading this post, we were meant to go to this sanctuary when I was in Thailand but couldn’t make it as our visa was about to run out. Next time I go back I will definitely be doing this. Just bookmarked this post for future reference

  • I’ve been to Chiang Mai and my friend and I decided not to patronize any elephant related activity simply because we were told how these gentle giants are mistreated. Happy to know that this place offers something different. You sure looked like you had a lot of fun. Makes me wanna go back to Chiang Mai soon.

  • Congratulations, you got your wish haha… I personally am not interested to go there, for reasons I’d rather not divulge. But it looks like you guys had a lot of fun especially when it was time to bathe the elephants.

  • hahaha thanks Marge! Punta ka din! Saya kaya dami pa pogi dun! haha miss you! xx

  • Himanshu Barsainya

    Hey Cathy,
    Being an an indian, i have pecial affinity for this beast.
    Your article has given me more reasons to believe why Thiland is the land of elephants.
    Great images.

  • Gokul Raj

    Seems like an exciting activity. I love the mud bath part. Seems like a lot of fun.

  • Cindy Collins

    This looks awesome. It is definitely on my bucket list too. Elephants are so beautiful it’s nice that there are places to care for them. The mud bath sounds like fun. They seem to be really enjoying it.

  • Emma McKay

    What a special experience. I love elephants but it’s super important to me to only be visiting them in a safe environment. Looks like you guys had a blast!

  • Shweta

    This sounds like just the thing that my 6 year old daughter would love. We took her to an elephant sanctuary in Kerala (south India) last year and she loved it. I second your comment on not riding elephants – they are ill-treated for tourists.

  • Drew

    I definitely agree with avoiding riding an elephant in Thailand, or anywhere for that matter. They never look particular healthy and doesn’t seem humane at all. At least the Elephant Jungle Sanctuary Camp seems to take good care of their elephants and offer them a safe place. The mud baths and swim looked particularly fun. Looks like the elephants were having a blast as well.

  • Anna Johnston

    Elephants are amazing animals but I hate the way they are trained and treated. Going to visit elephant sancturary’s were always on my list when in Thailand, but the more I found out about them, the less I wanted to support them in anyway. I’m sure there are good ones and I’m glad you had an amazing time. Great photos.

  • hi Anna! Yes thanks! They’re really amazing and they’re so lovely! I heard from other travelers that there are only a few places where elephants are not abused like Kanchanaburi, though at the elephant sanctuary where we went, they looked completely fine.

  • that’s right Drew! Never supporting elephant riding here, ever! The mud bath is so cool, like the elephants wanted to be pampered! Indeed, they had a blast!

  • That sounds fun! Children must love them. Elephants are so lovely even though they’re enormous! haha

  • A lot of fun, it’s their favourite part of the day actually!

  • that’s right! It’s their favourite part of the day actually!

  • Hi Himanshu, sure! Elephants are physically enormous but they have a pure heart and in Thailand, unfortunately
    some of their kind are abused which saddens me a lot!

  • That sounds like an amazing experience. I’m interested in visiting an elephant sanctuary with my kids and Sanctuary Camp 8 seems to offer what I’m looking for. I do not support riding elephants, and want to visit a ‘real’ sanctuary where elephants are treated well.

  • Vyjay Rao

    Elephants have always been a source of intrigue and fascination right from childhood. Thailand is known for its elephants and elephant tourism. When we were in Thailand we actually did not see a single elephant! This sanctuary looks pretty interesting and can see you have lot of opportunities to interact with the elephants. Hopefully the gentle giants are taken good care of.

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